Taming the bag-valve-mask

Using a BVM *properly* is, without a doubt, one of the most challenging tasks we perform in EM, EMS, and critical care. Most providers do not get enough initial training or ongoing practice. Perhaps the biggest factor that makes people do this poorly is the sympathetic surge experienced while ventilating a patient. This leads to lack of focus on the task and poor quality ventilation. It requires calm and collected performance when the brain is anything but. The person ventilating must be absolutely focused on that task and not distracted by other issues. Its not all our fault though. The BVM is really nothing more than a bellows reshaped to fit on people’s face, not the most advanced device.


-The first step to good BVM technique is properly positioning the patient. See my last post here for information on that topic.-

1. The Mask Seal
A good mask seal is essential for allowing the BVM to work at its full potential. Leaks lead to inadequate ventilation and loss of airway pressure between breaths. There are a few ways to maintain an adequate seal. Please note: the mask seal should be maintained at all times and not interrupted in between breaths. This allows the maintenance of airway pressure even during exhalation and between breaths. It is important to maintain airway pressure. Oxygenation is maximized with increased mean airway pressure.
When performing one-person BVM you can use the C-E grip to maintain a jaw thrust and mask seal. The non-dominant hand should be used to maintain a seal. The thumb sits on the nose side of the mask and the index finger wraps around the bottom of the mask. The other three fingers are placed on the jaw bone with the pinky at the back of the jaw. These fingers should pull the jaw forward maintaining a jaw thrust. The fingers on the mask should be used to help maintain the seal and minimize leaks. It may help to use the bag portion of the BVM as a lever to provide more mask seal on the side of the mask that is not being held. The bag can be pushed downward resulting in the mask being pressed into the face more on that side.
IMG_9160The optimal way to perform BVM ventilation is with two providers. A mask seal is held with both hands by one provider and the other squeezes the bag. When maintaining a mask seal with two hands a double C-E grip can be used. This allows both hands to be used for displacing the jaw forward and results in significantly improved mask seal. Another, often more effective, technique is placing the palms of both hands on the sides of the mask then using the index and other fingers to pull the jaw forward. This method may be preferred in difficult BVM situations. Maintaining a jaw thrust is essential to maximizing oxygenation. Otherwise the airway obstructs and prevents air passage.

2. Squeezing the bag
This part is important and can really make your patients worse if it is done poorly. The typical adult BVM has a volume of 1.0-1.2 liters. The tidal volume desired is usually about half of that. This means that you DO NOT need two hands to squeeze the bag. One hand is plenty sufficient and, in most cases, you can use two fingers. Only enough volume to cause chest rise and ETCO2 return is needed. Some people say to even use a pediatric BVM for adults because it is much closer to the actual tidal volume necessary. If the patient is spontaneously breathing simply augment the patient’s own breaths with a small volume. So why is volume so important? Too much volume can lead to barotrauma so it is important to avoid this. Also, providing too much volume results in hyperinflation of the lungs, increased intrathoracic pressure, and decreased venous blood return to the heart. Most sick patients rely on adequate preload so killing it with the BVM can really hurt them.
Volume is only part of the story though. We also have to be cognizant of the amount of pressure we deliver, the speed of the squeeze. There are a few reasons for this. When delivering breaths with a mask, as opposed to an ETT tube or SGA, air can go two places. The place it likes to go most is the lungs as there is not much resistance in that pathway. However, the lower esophageal sphincter can be overridden with only  a small amount of pressure. This results in gastric distention. It only takes a short time to completely fill the stomach with air and distend it significantly. This hurts us, and the patient, in multiple ways. The first is that people tend to vomit when their stomach is filled with air. This make airway management and ventilation more challenging. Additionally, filling the stomach with air causes it to compress the diaphragm and inhibit lung expansion which further impedes ventilation. So how can you minimize this? Make sure you deliver breaths slowly, over at least two seconds, if not longer. You can also use a pop-off valve that limits the amount of pressure that can be delivered.
The last part of the story is the rate. Now this is where people get really excited and make their patients sicker. There are very few patients that need 40 breaths/minute. It is important to consciously maintain an appropriate ventilatory rate. This is easily done by monitoring ETCO2. Shoot for a number that is appropriate for the patient condition, normal is 35-45 mmHg. If you’re going to fast it will decrease, too slow and it will increase.
In summary, deliver small volumes, with low pressures, at slower rates and this will ultimately benefit your patient.

3. Use airway adjuncts
Basic airway adjuncts can go a long way in the difficult to ventilate patient. In reality though, if you use all the tips in this post, you usually will not need any basic adjuncts. However, some people have large tongues and extra soft tissue that cannot be displaced with simple positioning and jaw thrust. In completely obtunded or unresponsive patients it is prudent to insert an adjunct initially to maximize chances of successful ventilation. Inserting a properly sized nasopharyngeal airway or oropharyngeal airway helps to bypass the tongue and create a passage for ventilation. Keep in mind the device must be properly sized so that it reached past the base of the tongue. If it does not reach far enough then all it is doing is acting as an obstruction and making ventilation more difficult. Also, keep in mind that inserting either device can illicit the gag reflex leading to vomiting.

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Image: pocketdentistry.com

4. PEEP
All aspects of airway management and assisted ventilation involve PEEP. Historically, PEEP use with a BVM has been minimal but recently it has become standard of care. PEEP (positive end expiratory pressure) is the amount of pressure that is maintained in the lungs and airways at the end of exhalation. This pressure is maintained by the glottis and upper airway structures in normal physiology. This pressure is what allows the alveoli to remain inflated and not collapse during the exhalation phase. When alveoli collapse, also known as atelectasis, there are a few adverse IMG_91601effects. The first is that they become significantly harder to recruit and inflate. Once an alveoli is collapsed it requires much more pressure to reinflate it. Alveoli that are collapsed cannot perform gas exchange leading to worsened oxygenation and ventilation. Additionally, when atelectasis occurs alveoli become damaged, less effective, and may rupture. This is especially true in patients with lung disease. Because of this, a PEEP valve should be used on all BVMs and adjusted individually for each patient. The typical setting for healthy lungs is 5 CMH2O but this can be increased in certain situations. Patients with pulmonary edema or other causes of physiologic shunt often require more PEEP to oxygenate and recruit lung tissue. Do not be afraid to increase PEEP if the oxygen saturation is not improving and always use at least 5 CMH2O.
PEEP can also aid in ventilation. Maintaining higher airway pressures, in combination with jaw thrust and good technique, can help keep the airway patent and maximize air movement. In order for PEEP to be effective the mask seal must be maintained at all times, even in between breaths.
Below are two videos from George Kovacs (@kovacsgj) that he developed in one of his cadaver labs. They demonstrate the incredible effects of PEEP and why it is so important.

BVM with PEEP

BVM with ETT and PEEP

5. BVM as CPAP/BiPAP
The application of PEEP via a BVM has another advantage. In the spontaneously breathing patient the BVM can be used as CPAP or BiPAP. If the mask is sealed well on the face, at least 15 lpm oxygen is flowing, and a PEEP valve is in place, the patient will receive the set amount of PEEP in the form of CPAP. Additionally, if you squeeze the bag when the patient breaths you can essentially provide BiPAP. Spontaneously breathing patients, even if minimally, often benefit greatly from only CPAP via BVM without squeezing the bag. This decreases the risk of gastric insufflation while providing support to the patient’s own respiratory drive.
Also, placing a nasal cannula under the mask at 15 lpm to provide additional oxygenation. It also generates additional airway pressure which supports the generation of PEEP. This is an excellent technique to use for preoxygenation prior to intubation without having to setup a CPAP or BiPAP machine.
Video below, also from George Kovacs, demonstrates this technique.

PEEP as CPAP

6. Add a nasal cannula
The nasal cannula has become a mainstay of airway management. Oxygenation through the nose is significantly easier and more effective than through the mouth. Adding a nasal cannula at 15 lpm or greater under the BVM has great benefit. It increases the overall FiO2 delivered and it aids in generating airway pressure when combined with a PEEP valve.
You can also give apneic CPAP during the apneic period of RSI. Patients who require PEEP to oxygenate should have it maintained for as long as possible without interruption. Once the airway pressure decreases the alveolar recruitment generated by the PEEP is lost. But, during RSI, we often try to avoid ventilating during the apneic period for fear of regurgitation. PEEP is usually generated by breathing or ventilating but is typically lost during apnea. However, adding the nasal cannula allows PEEP to be maintained as it provides flow inward which increases airway pressure. With this, you can maintain your BVM mask seal during the apneic period and help maintain airway pressure without ventilating.

7. End-tidal CO2
ETCO2 should be used on all patients who are obtunded or have respiratory distress. It is an invaluable tool for monitoring respiratory status. It can be done with a nasal cannula type device or in-line device. An in-line ETCO2 adapter can be placed between the mask and the BVM adapter in the same way it would be placed on an ETT. Maintain a good mask seal and you will get a nice ETCO2 waveform to help guide your ventilation. If you are not getting a waveform this is indicative of poor mask seal or lack of air movement through the airway. If this occurs adjust mask seal and ensure the jaw is being pulled forward.
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Summary
The BVM is a difficult device to master. Whenever you use it be sure to consciously consider HOW you are using it. Position the patient properly, upright and ear-to-sternal notch. Always make sure to maintain a constant mask seal. Deliver small, low pressure breaths. Use airway adjuncts as needed. Add a PEEP valve to maximize alveolar function and consider using the BVM for CPAP or BiPAP. Add a nasal cannula with 15 lpm O2. And finally, always use ETCO2 when ventilating a patient.

Remember: if this guy can do it, so can you.

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Taming the bag-valve-mask

Airway anatomy – and how we make it worse

“The best position to kill a patient in, from an airway perspective, is flat on their back.”
-Rich Levitan – @airwaycam

This is one of the most important concepts in emergency airway management. Rich knowszTXey5ETB this better than anyone, having examined 20 cadaveric airways per month for the past 16 years in addition to clinical research. He coined the term “coffin position” to describe the detriment of having your patient supine. Cannot Oxygenate Face Flat in Neutral position. There are a few reasons this is true and it is important to understand them. Not only will it help improve patient outcomes but it will make you better at managing airways.

The Upper Airway
When we talk about airway management we are talking about the upper airway. Barring any severe trauma or pathophysiology, the airway south of the glottic opening is intrinsically patent. We are really only worried about the passageway above the glottis which is made up of soft tissues that do not have spontaneous patency. Normally, patency is maintained by muscles controlled consciously and unconsciously. But when patients are obtunded or sedated they lose the ability to maintain upper airway patency.

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Graphic: airwaycam.com
People do not maintain a perfectly straight posture. The neck curves forward which maintains the head in a slightly forward position. From an airway perspective, this helps keep the tongue and other soft tissue off of the posterior pharynx. You can easily see how this is effected when you stand flat against a wall. You will see that placing your head straight back against the wall causes discomfort. This shortens the thyromental distance leaving less room for the tongue and decrease mouth opening. Obviously you can still breath as you are able to maintain conscious control of your airway. But compromised patients lose this ability when they are positioned this way. Now, take the a patient and lay them flat on their back. Not only do you misalign the upper airway but the tongue and soft tissues fall back with gravity. These two mechanisms will undoubtedly cause partial or complete airway obstruction in obtunded patients.

Airway xray
Left: Ear-to-sternal notch, Middle: Neutral, Right: Hyperextended                    Graphic: Rich Levitan
The Lungs
Bad things happen to the lungs when a patient as lying flat. It becomes much more difficult to fully recruit lung tissue. This is due to a number of factors and is much more profound in obese patients. The abdominal contents are no longer held off the diaphragm by gravity. They move upward and often push on the diaphragm preventing it from contracting fully. This also decreases the amount of thoracic space the lungs have to expand in. The net result is decreased amounts of usable lung tissue, lower functional residual capacity, and more difficulty recruiting alveoli. In addition, the obese have weight from fat which puts pressure on the chest and abdomen preventing lung expansion and contributing to the abdominal component of supine positioning. Obese patients desaturate significantly faster than average sized patients, mainly for this reason.

The Stomach
RSI is a technique that was designed with the stomach in mind, not the lungs. This is very important as it highlights one of the most detrimental complications during airway management, regurgitation. Vomiting can be active or passive. In an RSI scenario it is often passive as paralytics are given to help prevent it. However, active or passive vomiting can occur at any time during the airway management process. It is further encouraged by poor bag-valve-mask technique which insufflates  the stomach with air. It is imperative to try to minimize the potential for regurgitation as much as possible.

Intubation
The end goal of any airway scenario is to secure the airway in the most appropriate means. This is frequently through endotracheal intubation. In the emergency setting, I believe the most frequently neglected aspect of this process is positioning. Proper patient positioning is probably THE MOST IMPORTANT factor that contributes to obtaining an adequate view of the cords. Not surprisingly, the worst position a patient can be in for this is flat on their back.

The Solution
All of the problems discussed above can be drastically improved by properly positioning your patient. This goes for ANY airway scenario whether you are setting up to intubate or doing procedural sedation. These techniques will work in the vast majority of patients.

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Graphic: airwaycam.com
1. Place the patient in the ear-to-sternal notch position.

This method involves aligning the external auditory meatus with the sternal notch in the horizontal plane. If your patient is supine you are essentially elevating the head higher than the surface of the bed. This is to get the patient into the more natural airway position as was discussed earlier. It is easily accomplished by placing a pillow or towels under the occiput. Obese patients require more padding, or ramping. In kids, obtaining the position may require elevating the shoulders instead.

 

Ear-to-Sternal-Notch
Graphic: RebelEM.com
The benefits of this position are substantial. First, it helps lift the tongue off the posterior pharynx reducing airway obstruction. It also drastically improves glottic view when intubating by properly aligning the airway and creating a more direct pathway to the cords. Also, adding a jaw-thrust to this position will create maximal airway patency in any situation.

2. Sit your patient UP!

If you can only take one thing away from this post it is this: sit your patient up. This goes for any type of airway management and post-intubation situation. If the airway is at all compromised, sit them up. There are quite a few reasons to do this and really no downfalls.
In the upright position the lungs are able to expand more fully. This increases the functional residual capacity and improves oxygenation. This is the reason that intubated patients should usually be upright post-intubation; it will maximize their lung recruitment and ventilation. It also aids in oxygenation prior to intubation.
When patients are upright their tongues are not as prone to falling posterior. Combined with the ear-to-sternal notch position an upright patient will have a more spontaneously patent airway than a supine patient.
The upright position is likely to decrease the chances of regurgitation and aspiration. This is simple gravity but also is due to decreased pressure on the stomach and improved bag-valve-mask mechanics.
BVM use will be easier and more effective in the upright position. The airway is maintained more patent thus allowing better ventilation and less gastric insufflation.
Airway views during intubation are better with the patient sitting upright at 30 degrees or more. This is due to better alignment of airway structures and less force being required to displace the soft tissues.

3. Perform a jaw thrust

A jaw thrust is the most effective way of maintain airway patency non-invasively. Simply doing a head-tilt, chin lift does not completely displace the tongue from the posterior pharynx. If a patient is experiencing anatomical airway obstruction a jaw-thrust is likely to resolve it by lifting the tongue and creating a pathway for ventilation. It is important to maintain a jaw thrust in any patient being BVM ventilated, not controlling their own airway, and during the apneic period of RSI. When using apneic oxygenation (which should be used during any RSI) the airway must remain patent via jaw thrust during the apneic period.

The bottom line: patients with a compromised airway should be positioned upright in the ear-to-sternal notch position. Use a jaw thrust to resolve anatomical airway obstruction.

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References:

  1. Khandelwal, N, et al. “Head-Elevated Patient Positioning Decreases Complications of Emergent Tracheal Intubation in the Ward and Intensive Care Unit.” Anesthesia and Analgesia 122.4 (2016): 1101-107.
  2. Levitan, Richard. Fundamentals of Airway Management. 3rd ed. Irving: Emergency Medicine Residents Association, 2015. Print.
  3. Weingart, Scott, and Levitan, Richard. “Preoxygenation and Prevention of Desaturation During Emergency Airway Management.” Annals of Emergency Medicine (2011): 165-75.

 

Airway anatomy – and how we make it worse

EMS Gathering in Killarney

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I was lucky enough to get to Ireland a bit before #smaccDUB for the #EMSG16 in Killarney, which is one of the most beautiful places I’ve been. I got there from Dublin by driving, which was an adventure in itself. Surprisingly, switching seats and sides of the road was not a huge challenge and I got used to it pretty quickly.

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The EMS Gathering has been held in Killarney three times since its start in 2013. It is special in that it brings together EMS from throughout the country in a way that is meant to inspire progress in their system. I think this year was unique because providers from all over the globe attended, most before going to SMACC. I only knew about the gathering because the SMACC organizers were kind enough to mention it in their registration process. Despite not knowing about it before, the EMSG became one of the most valuable experiences of my Ireland trip.

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We made a ton of new friends!

To start, Killarney is beautiful. One of the most scenic spots in Ireland, or so I hear.  The downtown area is full of activity and it is a fun place to be. It turned out to be a perfect spot for the gathering. One of the best parts about the EMSG was getting to meet EMS providers from around the world. Many were from Ireland but probably half of the people I met were not.

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Great pubs too

On Wednesday night the gathering staff hosted an EMS symposium at The Malton, which was a spectacular venue for the conference. They served a great meal and there were a few talks given that night. Paul Gallen and others spoke about the EMS system in Ireland. It was interesting to hear the similarities and differences. It seems that Irish EMS is working to become more professionalized and gain more respect in the medical industry. This seems to be a theme worldwide.

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Dr. Mark Forrest gave an entertaining promo on Penthrox, an inhaled analgesic designed for prehospital use. It sounds like it could have great value once it become more widely recognized.

The two most striking talks were from Gerry McCoy and John McManus. They each had unique talks about trauma in their settings. Mr. McCoy spoke about trauma in Belfast before the trauma system became what it is today. They were seeing a massive influx in firearm injuries which helped form the trauma programs that exist now. Prof. McManus gave a talk about the trauma experience he has gained working in Iraq in the military setting. Both were accompanied by incredible stories and great images.

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Very comfortable seating arrangement

The conference officially ran on Thursday and Friday. The days were divided into didactic sessions in the morning and and hands-on/breakout sessions in the afternoon. The morning session on Thursday was a spectrum from birth to end  of life care. The first talk was from Dr. Mairead O’Riordan who made assisting with delivery sound easy. In reality, most babies will do well with little intervention. Mom will put herself in whichever position is most suitable to deliver the baby so always let her move as she needs to.

Professor Tony Ryan spoke about the Helping Babies Breath program which was launched in Africa. He put on a short skit which demonstrated the typical process of a baby being delivered in an impoverished setting. He then showed the differences in the care that can be provided after implementation of the program. In most of the third world access to medical care is nonexistent. However, many of the medical providers in small villages are there to help mothers deliver. Despite the effort many babies die because of lack of basic neonatal care that can be provided by almost anyone. The program is designed to train the providers in basic ventilation and airway techniques that can help a baby survive through its first few minutes of life. This is often all that is needed to improve outcomes in this population.

The next talk was from David Hennelly who is the clinical development manager for the Ireland National Ambulance Service. He spoke about the One Life Project which is working to improve cardiac arrest outcomes in Ireland. They have made great strides in improving access to rapid care throughout the country and they have seen increasing survival rates as a result.

The final morning talk was about end of life care from Prof. Will Molloy. The topic is one that is poorly known throughout EMS, emergency medicine, and critical care. There is often little thought given to what is truly the right thing for a patient at the end of their life. The focus should often be comfort and allowing the patient to die in a way that they want to, rather than being artificially supported for long periods of time.

The afternoon activities were similar both days and unfortunately you can’t do all of them! The feedback from all the sessions was very positive. Most of them involved leaving the venue and participating in some sort of outdoor activity. There were a wide variety of activities including bicycling, motorcycle riding, and a boat tour all of which had a different medically related topics incorporated. One of the most popular sessions was the farm injuries course. This was held on a real farm and there were multiple immersive, high-fidelity simulations of farm injuries that are commonly encountered. There were also indoor activities which included ultrasound, EKG interpretation, and simulation.

Both of my afternoons were spent helping as an instructor for EMS Pocus in the point-of-care ultrasound programs. I have a strong interest in ultrasound and our group is working to get the technology into the prehospital setting. Our sessions provided education on some of the most common and useful exams to perform in an critically ill patient. These included: basic cardiac ultrasound, lung ultrasound, and the RUSH exam. For more information click here.

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On Thursday night another social event was held. It was set in the picturesque Irish countryside. Dinner and drinks were served and a Helicopter EMS and Search and Rescue panel was the featured event. There were providers from some of the world’s leading helicopter programs including Sydney HEMS, London HEMS, Travis County STAR Flight, and many more. There was much discussion about some of the unique challenges that face prehospital providers. As always, there was some debate about how to ideally staff a medical helicopter. In the end, it comes down to the mission profile to determine the right crew configuration.

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The talks on Friday were primarily all about trauma care. We heard from experts about
their individual trauma programs and ones they had worked in. Adrian Murphy spoke about his experience at London HEMS and Mike Abernethy gave an informative talk on farm injuries which carried into his SMACC talk.

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Ashley Liebig sat on the couch, kicked her shoes off, and gave a talk on human factors. She spoke about how stress influences us as providers and how patients are affected. She used swift water rescue as an example, describing how she has to balance the patient’s life with her own stress while rescuing a distressed swimmer. As always, she gave an impactful and meaningful talk.

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He definitely hit the ball

Friday night was the Grande Finale final event sponsored by the EMSG organizers. It was held at the scenic Muckross Farms. We were fed like royalty and got to experience some Irish entertainment. There were kids Hurling and Mike Abernethy and others became expert hurlers. There were also falconers there with a variety of rare bird species that were fascinating to see in person. Overall, an incredible night of fun and socialization.

 

 

 

The EMS Gathering was an amazing precursor to SMACC. My Ireland experience would not have been the same without it. It demonstrated that Ireland is a leader in EMS worldwide and has a progressive outlooks for their EMS system. I would encourage anyone to attend this event if it is held again and to visit Killarney as it is a truly beautiful place.

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Found this wall of mostly U.S. patches in a pub in Killarney

 

EMS Gathering in Killarney

#smaccDUB reflection

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Where does one start after a week like that?

The #FOAMed community is unique. Anyone who uses it regularly or contributes to it knows that. For most of us the knowledge we gain through social media and free sources drives our practice heavily. The format and environment helps us to stay motivated and always wanting to learn more. This passion that we have is what drives us to attend SMACC in the first place.

This year was my first SMACC experience.  I couldn’t make it last year when it was in my own country. However, I think being in Ireland provided a unique aura. Ireland had a special meaning for FOAMed; it was born there, in a pub in downtown Dublin. In addition, one of the greatest FOAMed contributors and visionaries lived there. This of course was John Hinds. I won’t say much about him because anyone in this community must know who he was and I could never do him the justice he deserves. The conference this year had a certain feel too it. It seemed very appropriate to be there in honor of John. This was especially true at #SMACCforce.

There were many incredible pre-conference sessions offered. It was almost impossible to choose which to attend. The reputation of SMACCforce, the prehospital workshop, brought me there.

 A full day of education from some of the smartest, most motivated prehospital providers in the world. One of my favorite talks, an empassioned rant really, was from Per Bredmose (@VikingOne_). He spoke about the difficult situation of intervening when care is not appropriate or not aggressive enough. It really embodied the SMACC and FOAMed mantra of patient advocacy.

“For fuck’s sake stand up for your patient!”

-Per Bredmose, The Viking

SMACCforce brings the importance of good prehospital critical care to the forefront. It is often overlooked, especially in the United States.

Monday night was also quite notable. During the trip I became quite involved with the EMS Wolfpack (@EMSWolfpack) and EMS Pocus (@emspocus, http://www.emspocus.com). The two groups collaborated to throw a pub night. We rented out an entire bar, The Trinity Inn, for a night of informal point-of-care ultrasound education, socialization, and alcohol consumption. We had no idea what to expect, nor did we know what was coming.

It started off with a few people learning the basics of POCUS (echo, RUSH, vascular access). But, before we knew it, the bar was full. It was impossible to even walk through it. In addition, Jim DuCanto (@jducanto) was there with his SALAD vomiting airway mannequin. This is probably the only documented instance of SALAD being performed in a bar; we are very proud of this. People were learning difficult airway techniques all throughout the night until the bar kicked us out.


However, the learning that was done was not the most remarkable point of the night. We had providers of all levels, from every continent, and from all specialities of critical care attend. People  networked and collaborated with each other in a format that I believe is unique to SMACC. As was spoken about in SMACCforce, there was a true flattening of the heirarchy where paramedics were engaging physicians, and vice versa, in relevant and important conversation. The night was an overwhelming success and next year we will need a bigger pub.

Tuesday was the first day of the main conference. There were so many incredible talks that it would take me days to summarize them so I will focus on the ones that impacted me the most. The conference started with an incredible opening with a light show and the new smaccDUB soundtrack. This was followed by the John Hinds plenary, a series of speakers with topics designed to commemorate John.


Perhaps the most inspirational was Scott Weingart’s (@emcrit) talk where he encouraged us all the meditate. Scott has recently focused a lot on the psychological aspects of critical care and this is one way he believes that we can all improve our mental health and resuscitation abilities. There was also a video commemorating John’s life and a talk from his partner. I think there were tears throughout the auditorium.

“I will not leave you.”

-John Hinds to all of his patients

“Don’t be a resus wanker.”

-Also John

The rest of day one consisted of concurrent sessions. First I attended the Oxygen and Stress session where we learned from geniuses, including John Myburgh (@JAMyburgh) and self-proclaimed sex god Mervyn Singer that supplemental oxygen is probably a bad thing in most cases and patients do well without it.


The second half of the day was the How I Do It session. Providers spoke on specific practices they use regularly. Casey Parker (@broomedocs) discussed the importance of using evidence based values such as pretest probability when performing tests. In general many of the tests done in the emergency department are not helpful and difficult to interpret. Per Bredmose spoke on his use of inhaled nitric oxide in Norwegian helicopter critical care. Their use focuses primarily on bridging ARDS patients to ECMO but also in any cause of pulmonary hypertension such as pulmonary embolism. The day concluded with a panel discussing how medical knowledge and new data should be disseminated. There was argument about peer-review, journal bias, and the high cost to access new studies. The broad consensus was that we need a centralized, open access location to put all new data which has a publicly viewable peer-review process.

Day two started with a plenary called Slaying Sacred Cows. This was a series of four incredible talks which truly all deserve individual recognition. Resa Lewis (@ultrasoundREL) spoke inspirationally about women as leaders. She taught lessons that are designed to help both men and women succeed as leaders in medicine.

The talk that may have been the most impactful and lacrimation generating of the entire week was Ross Fisher’s (@ffolliet) Things That Scare Me, which he gave with no slides as the audience sat in intent silence.


Ross is a pediatric surgeon in the UK and he described some of the times during his practice that he has been most scared. This included operating on a 600 gram neonate with NEC. A patient this size has a blood volume of about 60 mL and they tend to bleed. He said that fear is the emotion that ends careers of excellent providers. The most important factor in dealing with fear is support from colleagues. In the right environment, fear can be overcome. This talk took such courage to give to a room of 2,000+. It is a must hear for everyone once it is released.

The next was from Reuben Strayer (@emupdates) who spoke about treatment of agitation. The most important part of the talk was this: we want droperidol back in the U.S.! It is a safe and effective drug for the significantly disruptive patient. If the patient is combative, or a threat to themselves or others, IM ketamine is the agent of choice.

The last talk of the morning plenary was from the amazing Liz Crowe (@LizCrowe2). She spoke about love in critical care and how it really impacts patient outcomes and provider health. As expected the talk was full of laughs and sexual enuendo. Remember your patients, patient families, and colleagues all need love.

The morning concurrent for me was All Heart. There were awesome talks on pediatric heart conditions, cardiac surgery patients, and the RV.


Haney Mallemat (@CriticalCareNow) intrigued the audience by proposing a modern approach to PEA arrest. Not all are the same and underlying causes must be identified and treated if ROSC is to occur. PEA is really an umbrella term, much like SVT. Ultrasound should be used to distiguish between pulselessness with rhythm and echo motion (PREM) and pulselessness with rhythm and echo standstill (PRES).

The afternoon of day two featured three different forums, of which I attended Bare Knuckle EM. There were four sessions which included an EM literature update. It turns out bacon can be used to treat epistaxis! Who knew? (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22224315) Actual relevant topics were also discussed. The three following sessions were pro/con debates about important topics in EM. The topics were: EM is a failed paradigm, POCUS is a problem, and thrombolysis in submassive PE. Check these when they are released. The day concluded with SONIC BOOM, an entertaining and educational display of POCUS techniques.

We can’t get through day two without mentioning the incredible gala. The event was held at the Guinness Storehouse, the five floor venue where Guinness is made and sold in large quantities. Around 2,100 people attended and it was an awesome time.


The last day started off interestingly. The auditorium was about 1/4 full as a result of gala activities the night before. It gradually filled throughout the morning. The plenary talks were themed Beyond the Ivory Towers. The first two talks were from Kath Maitland (@KathMaitland) and Nikki Blackwell. They both discussed topics regarding their work in Africa providing care for critically ill patients with few resources. Kath focused on oxygen and its potential overuse.

Next, EM physcian Ashley Shreves discussed the immensely important topic of palliative care in the ED. This is done poorly pretty much everywhere. Incredible talk that will inspire you to do better.

“The treatment for death is probably not CPR in many cases!”

Ashley Liebig (@ashleyliebig) stole the show with her talk The Golden Fleece, The Golden Hour, and The Golden Rule.


In critical care, pre-hospital and in-hospital, providers carry a massive burden. Clinical responsibility paired with emotional trauma often leads to the downfall of incredible people. Ashley gave an emotional and honest talk with essentially no slides. I encourage everyone to listen to this when it is released.

Brining Sexy Back was the theme of my morning session. Weingart spoke about post-intubation sedation and analgesia. Remember: analgesia always and FIRST. The most notable talk though was from Alex Psirides (@psirides) on Why Your Hospital is Broken.


This talk was a reality check but true for most places. The focus of most hospital systems is often not truly the patient, it is the providers. Another must-hear.

My last concurrent of the conference was A is for Airway. Four great talks here. Reuben Strayer presented a somewhat novel approach to laryngoscopy designed to make providers slow down and not rush. Listen to the lecture and see what its all about.

The finale was a ton of fun. Two teams of four were pitted against eachother in contests testing knowledge, teamwork, and skills. All the participants earned half price admission to SMACC next year!

So in summary: epic. This post does not even scratch the surface. The talks were incredible. But what really makes SMACC special is the people you meet. And I can’t quanitify that in words. If you have not been to SMACC, go! Also, if you are not involved in #FOAMed and the twitter world I encourage you to start. Go to http://www.smacc.net.au and listen to the previous talks. Also, go to http://www.lifeinthefastlane.com, the original FOAMed site which has thousands of articles. Get on twitter, search #FOAMed, #smaccDUB, and get involved.


#dasSMACC 2017

Next year SMACC will be held in Berlin, Germany.

Venue: Tempodrom

June 26-29, 2017

#smaccDUB reflection